Kill PowerPoint

BE13

“People who know what they’re talking about don’t need PowerPoint”

Steve Jobs

When an executive team meets to work, a question that helps understand the value of the meeting is: what do we have to achieve together during this meeting that is much more important than what we can do separately during that same time?

Normally, in conventional organizations and following the birth of PowerPoint, the presentation formula was adopted as an effective way to work. In practically in all the companies we have worked, we’ve observed that the presentation culture prevails and meetings, rather than being a space where people think and work, it’s a place where attendees gather passively to ‘watch’ the presentations.

We’ve heard here and there, complaints about no longer wanting to have meetings if it’s just to watch presentations. We’ve seen managers and teams spend hours to prepare presentations just for their boss. This is simply not efficient. As we have said before, the complexity we are experiencing today is greater than it used to. Twenty or thirty years ago, it was viable to use acetates for presentations with forecast graphs of market growth and business plans because predictability and specialization allowed it. Today, however, information in real time, ergo ‘live’, is available and this enables real time decision-making. Therefore, time spent with our team preparing presentations diminishes the time we have to think and decide, add value that is.

In meetings, when we ‘present’, the rest spends most of the meeting time ‘watching’ it and normally only 15% of the remaining time is used for analyzing and decision-making, leaving out issues to be addressed, normally needing a follow up meeting. “Ok, work on it and we’ll review it on our next meeting.” That is to say, meetings are not efficient, at least not enough. If in the business culture the hierarchic system prevails, it’s even less efficient because the presentation is made ‘for the boss’.

In contrast, in resourceful organizations we have found, that teams are aware of the ‘collective’ time value and it’s seen as the most expensive resource the organization has, therefore it must be taken seriously. What could be more important than making decisions, while having the executive team of the company gathered? Nothing. Everything that isn’t making decisions collectively separates the organization from its capacity of constant execution while facing complexity.

Thus, within the corporate culture it is increasingly urgent to ‘kill the PowerPoint’. Because when the team gathers, it’s mandatory to accomplish three things: think, decide and commit.

These are the only three actions that justify, from the cost-benefit perspective, getting the team together. Every time,  management gathers to observe presentations, reducing their thinking, deciding and committing, the organization is losing a key opportunity to maneuver.

Later on, we will explore a conscious format for effective meetings. But what we want to bring today to team conversations that have meetings is this central thought: there is nothing that justifies that a executive team spends time together if it’s not to think, decide and commit. Everything else could be called social activities.

Kill PowerPoint

Muera el PowerPoint

BE13

“La gente que sabe de lo que está hablando no necesita PowerPoint”

Steve Jobs

Cuando un equipo ejecutivo se reúne a trabajar, una pregunta que sirve para entender la importancia de la reunión es ¿qué es aquello que tenemos que lograr juntos durante esta reunión, que es mucho más importante que lo que podemos hacer en el mismo tiempo por separado?

Normalmente, en las organizaciones convencionales y a raíz del nacimiento del PowerPoint, se adoptó como forma efectiva del trabajo la mecánica del las “presentaciones”. Prácticamente en todas las empresas en las que hemos trabajado, observamos que la cultura de la presentación prevalece y que las juntas, más allá de ser un espacio en el que la gente piensa y trabaja, es un espacio en el que los asistentes se reúnen pasivamente a ver presentaciones. Aquí y allá escuchamos la queja de que ya no es posible tener más juntas sólo para ver prestaciones. Observamos que en su agenda, los managers dedican horas junto con sus equipos, sólo para preparar la presentación para el director. Esto sencillamente ya no es eficaz porque, como hemos dicho en otros casos, la complejidad a la que nos enfrentamos es cada vez mayor. Es decir, hace 20 ó 30 años era factible presentar en los famosos acetatos, gráficas de pronósticos del crecimiento del mercado y el plan de negocio para ese año; porque la predictibilidad y la especialización lo permitían.

Hoy, estamos observando que la información en tiempo real, es decir “viva”, está disponible y esto permite tomar decisiones mucho más ágiles.  Por lo mismo, el tiempo que dedica un equipo a preparar una presentación es directamente proporcional al tiempo que resta para pensar y decidir. Normalmente en las juntas de hoy, cuando se “hace” la presentación, el equipo destina la mayor parte de la reunión a “verla” y típicamente el 15% del tiempo restante se destina al análisis y la toma de decisiones, lo que deja temas sin tratar y esto comúnmente lleva a otra reunión.  “Ok, trabajen en ello y lo revisamos en la siguiente junta”. Es decir las juntas no son efectivas, o suficientemente efectivas. Y si en la cultura prevalece el estilo jerárquico; menos pues la presentación se hace, literalmente para el de mayor rango.

En contraparte, cuando se trata de organizaciones más versátiles, encontramos que existe, en el equipo, consciencia del valor del tiempo “en colectivo” que se ve como el recurso más caro que tiene la organización y por lo mismo, hay que aprovecharlo.

Al reunir al equipo ejecutivo de la empresa ¿qué podría ser más importante que tomar decisiones? Nada. Todo lo que no sea tomar decisiones en conjunto, aleja a la organización de su capacidad de ejecución constante frente la complejidad. Así pues, en la cultura de las empresas se vuelve cada vez más urgente “matar el powerpoint”. Cuando el equipo está reunido, es preciso que hagan sólo tres cosas: pensar, decidir y comprometerse. Estas son las únicas tres acciones que por costo beneficio justifican que el equipo se reúna. Cada vez que la dirección se reúne a observar una presentación, reduciendo su tiempo de pensar, decidir y comprometerse, el negocio está perdiendo una oportunidad fundamental de maniobra.

Más adelante exploraremos un formato consciente para juntas efectivas, por hoy lo que queremos traer a la conversación de los equipos que hacen juntas, es esta reflexión central: no hay nada que justifique que un equipo de dirección pasen tiempo juntos si no es para pensar, decidir y comprometerse, lo demás podríamos llamarlo actividades sociales.

Muera el PowerPoint

The Question That Ends With All Gossip

BE12-2

“Truth prevails by itself, lies always require complicity.”

Epicteto de Frigia

Usually when facing change, speculation and gossip arises in organizations. And, what organization today isn’t facing a major change, either in generation, in its structure or of definition of their business model? Practically all organizations are facing major changes, because reality has become much more complex. Therefore businesses need more flexibility to continue to fulfill their purpose.

In this context, uncertainty manifests with gossip and speculation, as if we avoid talking about the issues we must talk about. It is common to hire PR agencies or Marcom experts and to define which are the messages that should feed the system. This works, but not in the best possible ways. The reason why an individual decides to speculate and create an alternative scenario is precisely because he or she doesn’t knows what reality is. What motivates us, as employees of an organization, to speculate is our need to have a context, a reference that makes us feel secure.

Speculation arises when facing uncertainty, but the safest avenue to a good business climate amidst uncertainty is the truth. This is also true in our personal and social lives. Even though truth might hurt, it is the most efficient way to face any complex situation. While speaking about this, I like to use the ocean’s analogy: it’s as if on the surface there is a strong storm, but at the bottom there is absolute calmness. It’s similar in an environment of uncertainty. When we engage in gossip, we enter the storm and we distance ourselves from the truth, from the bottom. So, how do we deal with those behaviors even when we, as leaders, have uncertainty? For example , if I don’t know if I will be the next CEO or if there will be an important layoff; or if I know that, because the company needs to face strategic decisions, they will fire some of my colleagues; then how do I behave so I am not perceived as someone who betrays and keeps secrets? How do we stay in the calm bottom, rather than at the storm of the surface? There is a very simple step: ask for the facts. This is the question that grounds us and, as a safety valve makes the weight get back into the bottom, allows us to stay connected with reality.

When a colleague says: “They’re saying Juan is going to get fired because Pedro is much better.” And you answer: “Really? Tell me more!” When you get hooked in the conversation, what you are doing is climbing to the surface, feeling as if circumstances are stormy. Reality can be stormy, but it can also be calm . The question that will take you to the bottom of the ocean is: What are the facts? In what facts are you basing your arguments? These are the questions that make differences lose significance. It is a question we usually don’t answer because, by being at the surface,  we blame the storm for our decisions. When I stop assuming, when I am in the calmness of the bottom and I check with reality, then I’m the one who has to make the decisions based on what is important to me, because I’m not in the storm.

In later posts we will talk a bit more about assumptions and their impact within organizations.

The Question That Ends With All Gossip

La pregunta que termina con todo chisme

BE12-2

“La verdad triunfa por sí misma, la mentira necesita siempre complicidad.”

Epicteto de Frigia

Frente al cambio en las organizaciones, normalmente surge el comportamiento de la especulación y el chisme y ¿qué organización hoy no está enfrentando cambios importantes, ya sea de generación, de estructura, de definición de negocios o de modelo? Prácticamente todas las organizaciones están enfrentando cambios importantes porque la realidad se ha vuelto más compleja, por lo tanto los negocios requieren de más versatilidad para poder seguir cumpliendo con su propósito.

En este contexto, la incertidumbre se manifiesta con los chismes de pasillo y la especulación, porque parece que lo necesario es evitar hablar de los temas que hay que hablar. Es común contratar agentes de relaciones públicas y expertos en comunicación para definir cuáles son los mensajes que deberán alimentar al sistema. Esto funciona, pero no siempre de la mejor manera. La razón por la cual un individuo decide especular y crear un escenario alternativo, es  justamente porque no conoce la realidad. Lo que nos motiva como empleados de una organización a especular, es nuestra necesidad de tener un contexto en el cual podamos tener una referencia que nos de seguridad.

Ante la inseguridad, surge la especulación y la avenida más segura al buen clima frente a la incertidumbre es la verdad, así también como en la vida personal y en nuestra vida social, la verdad, aunque puede doler, es el camino más efectivo para poder enfrentar cualquier situación compleja. Al hablar de esto, me gusta hacer la analogía del mar: en la superficie hay una fuerte tormenta, pero en el fondo existe la calma absoluta. De la misma manera sucede en el ambiente de incertidumbre, entramos en la tormenta justamente al involucrarnos en los chismes que están lejanos a la realidad, lejanos del fondo. Entonces ¿cómo nos enfrentamos a estos comportamientos aún cuando nosotros como líderes tenemos incertidumbre? Por ejemplo, si yo mismo no sé si seré el siguiente director general o si habrá un recorte de empleados importante; o si yo sé que, porque la empresa tiene que enfrentar decisiones estratégicas, despedirán a algunos de mis compañeros; entonces ¿cómo me comporto para que no sea percibido como alguien que traiciona y guarda secretos? ¿Cómo le hago para permanecer en la calma del fondo en vez de en la tormenta de la superficie? Hay un paso muy sencillo: pregunta cuáles son los hechos. Ésta es la pregunta que aterriza y que, como una válvula de escape hace que el peso regrese al fondo, nos permite estar conectados con la realidad.

Cuando llega un compañero y dice: ¿sabías que dicen que van a correr a Juan porque Pedro es mejor? Y tú le contestas: No me digas, platícame más. Al engancharte en la conversación, lo que haces es empezar a subir hacia la superficie, percibiendo las circunstancias como tormentosas. La realidad sí puede ser tormentosa, pero a la vez es calmada. La pregunta que te lleva hacia abajo es: ¿En qué hechos te fundamentas para decir eso? ¿Cuáles son los hechos? Esta es la pregunta que hace que las diferencias pierdan importancia. Es una pregunta que generalmente no respondemos porque, al estar en la superficie de la tormenta, la culpamos de nuestras decisiones. Cuando dejo de inferir, cuando checo con la realidad y estoy en el fondo donde hay calma, entonces soy yo el que tiene que tomar la decisiones en función de lo que para mí es importante porque no estoy en la tormenta.

En entregas posteriores hablaremos un poco más sobre las inferencias y cómo impactan en las organizaciones.

La pregunta que termina con todo chisme